EIFS / Dryvit Tempary Fix on Kroger

EIFS / Dryvit Tempary Fix on Kroger

Images of EIFS / Dryvit Tempary Fix on Kroger

Got a call from a contractor that had a Kroger where the front entrance way was falling down. We made it out there that day and mechanically fastened the EIFS back to the metal studs for a temporary fix to the problem.

EIFS / Dryvit Tempary Fix on Kroger

EIFS / Dryvit Repairs – Roof Rakes

EIFS / Dryvit Repair -Roof Rakes

Taking a closer look at EIFS / Dryvit repair – roof rakes

When you do a roof rake you want to make sure there is somewhere for the roof run off water to go other than behind the system. There should be two inches between the shingles and the EIFS.  Along the roof rake there should be a starter track installed. The first piece of foam sits inside the starter track. The starter track prevents any roof run off water from penetrating the system while traveling down the roof. At the end of the roof rake a kick-out flashing needs to be installed so that the roof run off does not drain behind the system.

Exterior Insulation and Finish System also known as Synthetic Stucco or Dryvit ®

EIFS / Dryvit Repairs – Roof Rakes

 

 

EIFS / Dryvit Repair on Meijer Ann Arbor

EIFS / Dryvit Repair

Ann Arbor Meijer EIFS / Dryvit Repair

A simple EIFS / Dryvit Repair on a Meijer in Ann Arbor Michigan. This was a pretty straight forward patch. The contractor had the president coming in to the store in a couple days so he needed it done asap. We did the demo and got a color sample within 2 hours and the entire patch was complete with color match in 48 hours.

 

EIFS / Dryvit Repair

Window prep for EIFS application

Window prep for an EIFS application

Proper window prep for an EIFS application is very important

With new construction EIFS it  is imperative to get the EIFS contractor in on the job site before the windows go in, so they can treat the window frames before they go in. If this is not done the entire system has a chance of failure before it even begins. Lets face it even the best windows can leak, and most times you did not buy the best, so it is a safe beat that sooner or later the windows will leak. If the window frame is now treated this is a recipe for disaster down the road. Even if you do not want or cannot get the EIFS guy down there before hand to treat the windows do it yourself. Simply apply flashing tape around the window frame. It has to cover the entire window jam, and come out on the face about 4 inches. Make sure the corners are cover well, and that there are no wrinkles in the tape. Of course, the EIFS manufacturers (Dryvit, Senergy, Sto) all carry a brand of the flashing tape, but in a pinch you can buy flashing tape at the local hardware store if it is going to be the difference between having all your windows protected or not. You may want to contact the EIFS manufacturer you are using for the project, and find out if not using the flashing tape, or not using the correct flashing tape is going to void your material warranty.

What happens when the windows are already in?

What should happen is that the windows come out, and the windows are treated with flashing tape. If the windows are not done correctly there is a good chance you are voiding the warranty. The specifications from the material manufacturer are very clear on the application of flashing tape around the windows.

How do you apply the Flashing Tape?

You start at the bottom of the window sil. The Flashing tape should go all the back to the inside edge of the sil jam, and down four inches onto the face of the wall. The tape should be cut six inches longer than the window opening to allow the tape to go up the window frame on each side by at least three inches. Use your knife to cut along three inch vertical and lay  the tape down on to the face of the wall. Make sure there are no wrinkles in the tape. Apply a small piece of tape in the corner that goes all the way to the edge of the sil jam out and onto the face of the wall at least four inches. The apply the two verticals the same way and finally the top of the window is applied.

What qualifies as Flashing Tape when it comes to EIFS?

When it comes to EIFS there are very trick rules, and variations of products is to be done very carefully as not to void your warranty. I will use Dryvit® and its particular material line to address these products used for window treatments. There are several products you can use to treat the windows with. Dryvit’s AquaFlash® being one of the best.

This post actually started from another post, and I wanted to expand on it as it is such an important topic.

Window prep for EIFS application
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Window prep for EIFS application

Attaching things to EIFS

Attaching things to EIFS

Attaching things to EIFS is not rocket science but you need to know what to do

I had a lady call me the other day wanting to know the correct way to fasten her hose holder to the outside of her EIFS home. She could not get it to stay on the wall. This is actually a very good question, because there is a very specific way to install things to the outside of this cladding (Exterior Insulation and Finish System also known as Dryvit ® or synthetic stucco) whether it is a hose holder or a down spout for a gutter. First of all you are going to have to use a screw long enough to go through the system. Typically you will have between 1 1/2 inches to 4 inches to go through. You can tell how thick the material is by checking the bottom. The Synthetic Stucco will stick out from the wall and you can measure it there. Use a 3 or 4 inch screw and a 3/8 inch piece of PCV pipe. Drill a hole with a 3/8’s drill bit into the cladding where you want the screw to go. Stick the PCV pipe in the hole and make a mark where it is flush with the wall. Remove the PCV pipe, and cut it on the inside of the line as not to have the pipe stick out past the wall, but remain flush with the Synthetic Stucco finish. Apply adhesive (PL-Premium®, found at your local hardware store) to the outside of the PCV pipe and insert it in the hole you just drilled. The PCV pipe should sit all the way back to the substrate (OSB), and come out flush with the stucco surface. It is very important that the pipe is a tight fit, and the adhesive should be around the end that is outward at the Exterior Insulation and Finish System surface to make a good seal. Wipe any excess adhesive away with a damp cloth before it drys. Now, fill the pipe about half way with silicone caulk, and screw your hose to the wall using the holes you just made. When you screw the screw into the pipe excess caulk will come out the PVC pipe again use your damp cloth to remove any excess caulk that gets on the stucco’s finish coat or top coat. That is the old school way of doing it, and of course nowadays you have a fancy new way of doing it, and that would be a Corrosion Resistant Fastener and Sleeve Set. Myself I still use the PVC pipe and it works great, and like I always say if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. If I was doing a large house or building that had down spouts I would however use the Corrosion Resistant Fastener and Sleeve Set’s just to save a ton of time.

Well, there you go, that is the correct way of attaching things to your Synthetic Stucco cladding.

The last thing you want to do is just run screws into your this cladding system, as it will create penetrations that water can enter the system and cause problems down the road.

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DIY EIFS – Do It Yourself EIFS Repairs

Attaching things to EIFS

 

 

 

Attaching things to EIFS / Dryvit ® / Synthetic Stucco

General Contractor and Homeowners with EIFS projects

General Contractor and Homeowners with EIFS projects

Do do list for general contractors and homeowners with EIFS projects

First thing for a general contractor or a homeowner to do is to educate themselves on the EIFS process and the new advancements in the industry so they know what they want. The Next Generation EIFS is a much improved system, and you should demand your contractor comply with its new standards. An air/water barrier is a must for all wood framed construction now, whether or not, you are using Synthetic Stucco.

The second thing that is a must with new construction is to get the contractor in  on the job site before the windows go in, so they can treat the window frames before they go in. If this is not done the entire system has a chance of failure before it even begins. Lets face it even the best windows can leak, and most times you did not buy the best, so it is a safe beat that sooner or later the windows will leak. If the window frame is now treated this is a recipe for disaster down the road. Even if you do not want or cannot get the stucco guy down there before hand to treat the windows, then do it yourself. Simply apply flashing tape around the window frame. It has to cover the entire window jam, and come out on the face about 4 inches. Make sure the corners are cover well, and that there are no wrinkles in the tape. Of course, the manufacturers (Dryvit, Senergy, Sto) all carry a brand of the flashing tape, but in a pinch you can buy flashing tape at the local hardware store if it is going to be the difference between having all your windows protected or not. You may want to contact the manufacturer you are using for the project, and find out if not using the flashing tape, or not using the correct flashing tape is going to void your material warranty.

The third thing to do is keep a close eye on the Exterior Insulation and Finish System progress, and make sure no corners are being cut. One of the main things that the contractors will not do is take the base coat all the way back to the substrate around the window and door expansion joints. On an Synthetic Stucco project the windows and doors will have a 3/8″ to 5/8″ expansion around the windows and doors. Typically the contractor will run the base coat on the face of the foam, but not turn it into the expansion joint. This is tedious and time consuming work to use a margin trowel around every window and door to make sure the base coat is applied all the way back to the substrate, but it is a necessary one.  If the base coat is not applied in the expansion joint you have exposed foam. The expansion joint is caulked, and when the caulk fails over time it creates a place for water to get behind the system. The caulk will fail quick as it does not stick well to the exposed foam like it does the base coat. your caulk should be low modulus, high performance, one-part, moisture curing silicone joint sealant. A closed cell backer rod should be used when caulking as well. The closed cell backer rod will not absorb water.

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EIFS Training

General Contractor and Home Owners with EIFS projects

 

 

 

General Contractor and Homeowners with EIFS projects